At Engagement Multiplier, one of the things we are proud of and passionate about is the type of client we choose to work with. If you are a business owner reading this, you’ll appreciate this: in any business, it’s good to be intentional about choosing whom you serve – your ideal type of customer. When you know who your ideal customer is, you can align your communications, improvements and support in ways that identify with those individuals.

Early on, we deliberately made the decision to only work with brave, caring, identifiable owners. Without having these three characteristics, business owners just won’t see the level of results we want to deliver.

What I’d like to do in this post is talk a little about what the first of these characteristics really means. What is it to be a “brave” business owner? And why is bravery so important?

 

Why bravery?

I chose bravery because, apart from the fact that it’s an admirable quality – we admire brave people – brave business owners do not believe that ignorance is a strategy.

Sadly, I’ve met many business owners who would rather not uncover the truth about what’s really going on in their businesses. My response to them when they tell me this is a ‘stage whisper’:

“They know it anyway.”

Whatever a business’s problems are, they are not secret. Employees are already talking about them.

The fact that you’re not lifting the lid on these troublesome issues and giving them attention probably means they’ve become bigger problems than they need to be.

 

You have to face the monster in the shadows

These problems are big and nasty whilst they’re lurking beneath the surface, or hiding in dark corners. But once you bring them out into the light, once you have everyone looking at them, they tend to shrink and become easy to deal with. Often, they’ll disappear altogether.

As a brave business owner, you’re agreeing to not call ignorance a strategy – you’re prepared to get issues out in the open.

I understand that for many of us, our businesses are a source of considerable pride. We’re protective of what we’ve built. Maybe even a bit defensive of it. And, most likely, you’ll confront things in your business that aren’t going as well as you thought they were.

But how great to have the courage, to be brave enough, to understand what those issues are.

And the people in your business are the best ones to tell you.

Once you’ve identified issues to tackle, you and your engaged team can move straight into problem-solving and address them once and for all.

Business owners that don’t want to lift the lid on the truth, they’re not the clients for us. Bravery is required to make real, lasting improvements.

 

Transferable insight: Whether you’re on Engagement Multiplier or not, identify an issue in your business right now. If you’re not sure what the issue is, call in two or three people in your business who you really trust, and ask them to identify the top three issues they see in your business right now. Pick one of those. Then, get a team of employees together, tell them the issue you’ve identified, and hold a workshop to brainstorm ways to solve it.